1. hotdiggitydog-blog:

    you lookin’ for trouble? that’s my middle name.

     
  2.  
  3. hotdiggitydog-blog:

    My superheroes.

     
  4. hotdiggitydog-blog:

    Holy demolition, Batman!

    Holy heart failure, Batman!

    Holy Long John Silver, Batman!

    Holy Captain Nemo, Batman!

    Holy costume party, Batman!

     
  5. coucan:

    Classical Spook-a-day #12: October 18th, 2014

    "Neptune, the Mystic" from The Planets (1914-16) by Gustav Holst

    Gustav Holst set out to write an orchestral suite based on the planets of our solar system in 1914. He ended up writing seven movements - Mars, Venus, Mercury, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. He gave each movement a subtitle, based on their astrological symbols.

    Holst achieves an eerie, unearthly sound in “Neptune” through the use of unusual meter - the entire movement is in 5/4 time, unlike most Western music, which is in 4/4 or 3/4 - as well as etherial harmonies and distant sounds. The score directs that the entire orchestra is to play “sempre pianissimo,” or always very quietly. Additionally, Holst makes use of some unusual instruments – a bass flute, a bass oboe, and a celesta. The bass flute is an uncommon instrument, an octave lower than a normal (concert) flute; it can be heard in unison with concert flutes at the very opening of the movement. The bass oboe also sounds an octave lower than its “normal” counterpart, the (soprano) oboe. Its sound approaches that of a bassoon, but it has a much brighter tone. Next, the celesta: it’s a small keyboard instrument, and works similarly to a piano. Unlike a piano, the hammers do not strike strings, but rather metal plates, which ring somewhat like a bell. The celesta produces a “twinkly” sound, which Holst takes full advantage of.

    Finally, Holst also uses a 3-part women’s chorus, and makes a special note in the score: “The Chorus is to be placed in an adjoining room, the door of which is to be left open until the last bar of the piece, when it is to be slowly and silently closed. The Chorus, the door, and any Sub-Conductors that may be found necessary are to be well screened from the audience.”  Thus, when the chorus first enters, the audience has no idea where the sound is coming from; they simply hear a eerie, otherworldly singing that comes out of nowhere, and, at the very end, fades out slowly after all else is gone. This is actually one of the earliest examples of a fade-out in music, and one of the few examples outside of popular music.

    Happy spooks!

    (via no-tritones-for-you)

     
     
  6. no-tritones-for-you:

    gwendolynmaxinestacy:

    First look at Emma Stone in Cabaret

    so excited

     

  7. mrchrismad:

    beaumarbre:

    random-homestuck-things:

    bishounen-jake-english:

    jackadiddlediddle:

    bishounen-jake-english:

    FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO DO NOT KNOW

    THIS IS A TRUMPET

    image

    THIS IS A TROMBONE

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    THIS IS A TUBA

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    AND THIS IS A FRENCH HORN

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    THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME

    You mean trumpet

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    Slidey Trumpet

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    Big ass trumpet

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    Drunk Trumpet

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    I’M GONNA PUNCH YOU

    My sides

    AT LEAST YOUR INSTRUMENTS LOOK DIFFERENT 

    image

    those are some fancy guitars

    (Source: spoopy-dawson, via no-tritones-for-you)

     
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  10. acfnextnotes:

    thevoraciousear:

    Various scores by composer George Crumb. What I find fascinating about these is that they were painstakingly written by hand before computers. The imagination required to come up with these visual as well as aural conceptions for a piece of music is unbelievable. 

    Music can visually be anything! When you write, don’t be tied to the staff paper! www.nextnotes.org

    (via no-tritones-for-you)